Monday, May 14, 2012

PINK LADY SLIPPER ORCHID

photos by PSC - Pink Lady Slipper Orchid (Cypripedium acaule)


 Pink Lady Slipper Orchid

She doesn’t like to be disturbed
So much relies on patience, persistence,
the perfect conditions

Seemingly rare, she’s
more common than you think
native and wild, hiding
in plain sight in the weak light
on the forest floor

Particular, but enduring
she knows what she lacks,
pursuing it with patience and diligence

Soaking up the timid rays
penetrating the canopy to where
she resides, she may wait years
for what she needs to flower

Offering no reward to pollinating bees,
she takes what they proffer, then
packs her bags lightly, setting her progeny
free in the breeze, hoping some
friendly fungus will fulfill their needs

Beautiful and lush, but also touchy and rash,
you should handle her with kid gloves
if you handle her at all

PSC/2009

 

11 comments:

  1. What personality! Did you know, Pam, that one of our provinces has this flower for its floral emblem? It is the province of Prince Edward Island, a beautiful place, home to Anne of Green Gables, sandy beaches and lots of potatoes!:)

    ReplyDelete
  2. She definitely has her own unique personality! :-) Yay, Prince Edward Island -- excellent flower choice! I didn't know that -- thanks, Patricia!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Pam, what wonderful rhythm, I feel like I could dance a waltz to this:-) and I love how you wove the visuals, science and personality together very clever!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ahhh, thank you, Sara! Such sweet feedback -- you've made my day! :-)

      Delete
    2. I'm so glad--you've certainly made mine many times with your wonderful comments :-)

      Delete
  4. That last stanza delights me, as you could very well be talking about a woman, instead of this gorgeous flower. ;)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Exactly so. ;-) Thank you!! :-)

      Delete
  5. I just learned of the Pink Lady Slipper's special needs a week ago...wow...this definitely earns the title of rare. Beautiful personification with the dual purpose of bringing facts, I like that, Pamela!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Hannah! When I first "discovered" them growing wild in the woods, I looked them up to learn more about them. The more I learned, the more they sounded like someone I know, so... they begged to be put into words. So glad you enjoyed it! :-)

      Delete
  6. One of my favourite spring-time blossoms...and a wonderful poem to go with Pamela...nicely done.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ahhh, THANKS, Sharon! So nice of you to stop by and comment! :)

      Delete